The Children of the Inquisition

WW 2250 $16.00
Who\'s Who

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[$16.00] 72 pages, 9.5 x 12.5", an ARTBOOK

Lavishly illustrated by Doug Gregory (of V2 fame), Tony Harris (the horror artist who did the Werewolf frontispiece) and Tim Bradstreet (a relatively unknown artist *snicker*) Who's Who has no game mechanics in it. It does, however, have 13 well-illustrated characters, with the full history of their lives and unlives, and what part they played in the time after the Inquisition which saw the formation of the Camarilla, the Sabbat, the Tremere, and many other important Kindred structures. (oh, and if you ever wondered how the Tremere became the Tremere, it's in there....heh heh heh) Oh, yeah. And Vlad Tepes is in it, too.


Review by Mithrandir (30 Sep 93)

Children of the Inquisition. This dissapointed me so much. The deal in this book is that it presents 13 vampires, minus stats for you to use in your Chronicles. Which is fine. Except for the fact that the descriptions themselves are far too short and useless. Vlad Tepes takes up a third of the book. Each of the descriptions wastes about two thirds of it's space telling of the character's life as a mortal and the night of his Embrace. Which is fine by me. But then the ammount presented of the character's immortal lives is somewhat pathetic. Montano and Vlad Tepes are the worst cases that spring to mind. Montano is thousands of years old, we are told. Yet, we learn of his meeting lasombra and the big fight of his Embrace and so forth. Then, a paragraph describes the next three thousand years of his life. Which is really cheap, in my opinion. Vlad Tepes' mortal life gets a very thorough run-down by way of practically copying out history that has been seen in a dozen places and adding bits and pieces about Tzimisces Kindred being behind it all. Then, once again, a brief skimping about the character's immortal life. (There is an interesting inconsistency with regard to the Dracula tale. According to CotI, Vlad simply Dominated Bram Stoker. If so, who is the letter at the start of V:TM from? It's from Vlad to Mina Harker many years after the events described in Dracula. But Mina doesn't exist, according to CotI. Confused yet?)

In all, I'd say that a lot more work could have been done on this product. The artwork is the only real redeeming feature of the thing. Lots of Bradstreet and others plastered all over it, and the book's layout and presentation are good. It's just a pity that the material itself is so shoddy.